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Wang Liulang

Wang Liulang ", also translated as Sixth Brother Wang ", is a short story by Pu Songling first published in Strange Tales from a Chinese Studio. The story follows a Chinese fishermans friendship with the title character, a water spirit who has to ...

                                               

James Arthur (disambiguation)

James Arthur is a British singer and winner of The X Factor in 2012. James Arthur may also refer to: James Arthur theologian died 1670, Irish Dominican friar and theologian James Arthur album, the singers self-titled debut album James B. Arthur 1 ...

                                               

Order of Saint Augustine

The Order of Saint Augustine is a mendicant order of the Catholic Church. It was founded in 1244 by bringing together several eremetical groups in the Tuscany region who were following the Rule of Saint Augustine, written by Saint Augustine of Hi ...

                                               

Film Heritage Foundation

Film Heritage Foundation is a non-profit organization, based in Mumbai, India, dedicated to film preservation, restoration and archiving of neglected classical and historic Indian films. It was founded by filmmaker, archivist and restorer Shivend ...

                                               

Crossopetalum

Crossopetalum, commonly known as Christmas-berries or maiden berries, is a genus of flowering plants in the family Celastraceae. It comprises about 30-40 species.

                                               

96th Regiment of Foot (disambiguation)

Six regiments of the British Army have been numbered the 96th Regiment of Foot: 96th Regiment of Foot, raised in 1824 96th Regiment of Foot, formed in 1803 from the 2nd Battalion, 52nd Regiment 96th Queens Own Germans Regiment of Foot, renumbered ...

                                               

Mihalj Silobod Bolsic

Mihalj Silobod Bolsic was a Croatian mathematician and musical theorist primarily known for writing the first Croatian arithmetics textbook Arithmetika Horvatzka.

                                               

Reginald Whitworth

Educated at Eton College, Balliol College, Oxford and the Queens College, Oxford, Whitworth was commissioned into the Grenadier Guards on 5 March 1940. He served as a staff officer during the Second World War. After the war he became commanding o ...

                                               

Troughton scale

The measurement scale spans 82 inches and is subdivided to tenths of inches. It is marked on a silver inlay in a brass bar; the bar itself is about 86 inches long.

                                               

Etruscan well

The Etruscan Well, also known as "Sorbello well" from the name of the noble family which still owns the mansion which includes the structure, is located in the old town of Perugia. Entrance to the well, currently open to the public as a museum, i ...

                                               

Nootka

The Nootka Fault on Nootka Island the South Coast of Magnusville, Canada The place called Nootka Sound, home to the Mowachaht, also known as the Nootka mageroo Nootka Island

                                               

Portrait of countess Yekaterina Skavronskaya

Portrait of countess Catherine Skavronskaya is a 1790 oil on canvas portrait by Elisabeth Vigee-Lebrun, now in the Musee Jacquemart-Andre in Paris. It was produced during her stay in Naples for its subject Yekatarina Skavronskayas husband Count P ...

                                               

Timpanogos (disambiguation)

Timpanogos derives from the name of a possible subgroup of the Shoshone. It may refer to: Timpanogos High School in Orem, Utah. Timpanogos Cave National Monument, a cave system near Mount Timpanogos. Lake Timpanogos, original name for Utah Lake, ...

                                               

Geranium solanderi

Geranium solanderi is a species of plant in the family Geraniaceae. It is native to Australia, and to New Zealand. It was first described in 1800 by Daniel Solander as Geranium pilosum, from a specimen found in New Zealand. However, the name was ...

                                               

Saco River (disambiguation)

Saco River may refer to: Saco River, a river in northeastern New Hampshire and southwestern Maine in the United States East Branch Saco River, a 13.2-mile-long 21.3 km river in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, a tributary of the Saco River E ...

                                               

High Park (disambiguation)

High Park is a 400 acres park in Toronto, Ontario, Canada dating to the late 1800s. Most of the original park was deeded by John Howard, architect and chief Toronto surveyor. High Park may also refer to: High Park station, a subway station in Tor ...

                                               

St Martins Church, Gospel Oak

St Martins Church is a Church of England church in Gospel Oak in London, England. Located on Vicars Road, the church building is Grade I listed. The church was built between 1864 and 1866 to a curious-looking design by Edward Buckton Lamb and dis ...

                                               

Roberto Vicentini

Roberto Vicentini was an Italian prelate of the Catholic Church who spent his career in the Roman Curia. He also worked in the diplomatic service of the Holy See from 1921 to 1924.

                                               

Giovanni Battista Marenco

Giovanni Battista Marenco SDB, more often known as Giovanni Marenco was an Italian prelate of the Catholic Church who worked in the Roman Curia, led an Italian diocese briefly, and then joined the diplomatic service of the Holy See.

                                               

Richard de Uphaugh

Richard George Duppa de Uphaugh was an English first-class cricketer. The son of Richard Duppa de Uphaugh senior and Ethel Ricketts, he was born at Camberwell in March 1895. He was educated at Harrow School. His progression to the University of O ...

                                               

Henry Bright

Henry Bright may refer to: Henry Bright MP 1784–1869, MP for Bristol Henry Bright schoolmaster, born 1724 1724–1803, English priest and schoolmaster at Abingdon School and New College School Henry Bright painter 1810–1873, English painter Henry E ...

                                               

Arthur Bisset

Arthur Vintcent Crossley Bisset was a South African cricketer who played first-class cricket for Western Province from 1903 to 1922.

                                               

Pyramid Hill Sculpture Park and Museum

Pyramid Hill Sculpture Park and Museum is a 300-acre non-profit park which features 80 large sculptures and is located in Hamilton, Ohio. In addition to outdoor sculptures, the grounds also feature a pioneer house dating to the 1820s with an unus ...

                                               

Kurland Provincial Museum and Athenaeum

Kurland Provincial Museum and Athenaeum was Kurzeme Society of Literature and Art museum with library. It was founded in 1818 in Mitau, at that time the capital of Courland Governorate of Russian Empire.

                                               

Georgiana Fane

Georgiana Fane was an English heiress, daughter of John Fane, 10th Earl of Westmorland and his second wife the former Jane Huck-Saunders. Her mother bore four other children before separating from her father, after ten years of marriage. Georgian ...

                                               

Ibrahim Suhrawardy

Ibrahim Suhrawardy was an Indian educationist, author and linguist from Balasore, Odisha. He is credited to have written the first English grammar books in Odia for the native students. He achieved high distinction in English studies in British I ...

                                               

Leeds Zoological and Botanical Gardens

Leeds Zoological and Botanical Gardens, also known as Headingley Zoo and later Leeds Royal Gardens, was open between 1840 and 1858 in Headingley, Leeds, West Yorkshire, approximately two miles out of the city centre and covering the area now occu ...

                                               

Kanmantoo

Kanmantoo is an Australian Aboriginal word which was applied to a copper mine in South Australia during the 19th century. It can now refer to: Kanmantoo group, a classification of Cambrian sedimentary rocks of the Adelaide Geosyncline Kanmantoo, ...

                                               

Johann Theodor van der Noot

Van der Noot was born in Luxembourg on 6 April 1769, to the merchant Jean-Nicolas van der Noot and his wife Madeleine Herman. He was descended from the Brussels patrician lineage of House van der Noot. He graduated from Leuven University as the f ...

                                               

Marmaduke (name)

Marmaduke is a masculine name of Irish and Gaelic origin, and has been variously interpreted as meaning "follower of Saint Maedoc" or as "leader of the seas". Notable people with the name include:

                                               

Carl Ludwig Grotefend

Carl Ludwig Grotefend was a German epigraphist, philologist and numismat. He played a key role in the decipherment of the Indian Kharoshthi script on the coinage of the Indo-Greek kings, around the same time as James Prinsep, publishing Die unbek ...

                                               

George Renwick (American politician)

Renwick was born in England on October 31, 1789. In 1802, Renwick immigrated with his fathers family to the United States, where they settled in Gorham, New York. Renwick attended school in Canandaigua, New York, and taught school in the winter. ...

                                               

Pitt (surname)

Used as a surname, Pitt most commonly refers to the following people: William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham William Pitt the Elder 1708–1778, Prime Minister of Great Britain 1766–1768 William Pitt the Younger 1759–1806, son of the above and Prime Min ...

                                               

Spandau (disambiguation)

Spandau arsenal, developing infantry weapons for Imperial Germany from 1850 to 1919 Spandau locality, a locality of Berlin Spandau Prison Spandau, a district of Berlin

                                               

Elizabeth Stack

Elizabeth Rachel Jean Stack was a New Zealand settler, author and botanist. Stack was born in Anglesey, Wales in 1829. She was the daughter of Humphrey Jones, the Controller of Customs at Holyhead. The youngest of nine, Stack was fourteen when sh ...

                                               

Emma Jones (New Zealand botanist)

Emma Jones was a New Zealand author, botanist and painter. Born in Stepney in London, Emma Buchanan was the eldest daughter of Emma and Andrew Buchanan. The Buchanan family emigrated to New Zealand on the Dinapore in 1857. Also on board were a wi ...

                                               

Aberdeen Ferryhill railway station

Aberdeen Ferryhill railway station was the temporary terminus of the Aberdeen Railway and the first railway station to serve the city of Aberdeen. Regular passenger service began on 1 April 1850. As the station is located some distance south of t ...

                                               

List of Bundesliga managers

These are lists of Bundesliga managers who have taken charge of the most matches or have won a title in this league, which is the top level of the German football league system and started in 1963.

                                               

Cremation volume

Cremation volumes are a genre of printed literature found in Thailand. They are commemorative books given as gifts to guests at Thai funerals, and usually include a biography of the deceased as well as other literary material. Their publication, ...

                                               

Posey

A posey can be a small flower bouquet and is usually tied with a colored ribbon. They can be used as a hairpiece, they can be pinned to an item of clothing like a dress or a suit, or they can be used for decorations on a dinner table. As a surnam ...

                                               

Nein (disambiguation)

Nein is a village in Israel. Nein may also refer to: The Nein EP, their 2004 recording The Nein, an American indie rock band Nein, a song by King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard, see 12 Bar Bruise Nein Records, an American recording company "nein", t ...

                                               

Magnetic 2D materials

Magnetic 2D materials are two-dimensional materials that display ordered magnetic properties such as ferromagnetism. After the discovery of graphene in 2004, family of 2D materials has grown rapidly, but it was not until 2017 that first 2D ferrom ...

                                               

MHR

MHR may refer to: Montpellier Herault Rugby, a prominent French rugby union club Mediterranean Historical Review, academic journal Sacramento Mather Airport Matheran Hill Railway Muswell Hill Railway Member of the Human Race M.H.R., an ironic exp ...

                                               

William Edwin Atkinson

Atkinson, born in England, moved with his family to Oshawa, Ontario as a child because his father opened an English Drug Store in the town. He attended the University of Toronto, studying chemistry, and worked as a pharmacist before he took the d ...

                                               

Max Kaser

Max Kaser was a German professor of Jurisprudence who taught successively at the universities of Munster, Hamburg and Salzburg. The principal focus of his scholarship and teaching was on Roman law. He became a member of a number of learned societ ...

                                               

Barbara Maria Zakrzewska-Nikiporczyk

Barbara Maria Zakrzewska-Nikiporczyk is a composer and musicologist who was born in Poznan, Poland. She studied composition with Florian Dabrowski at the Poznan Academy of Music, graduating in 1969. She finished her postgraduate studies in librar ...

                                               

Sarah Duhamel

Duhamel was the daughter of an operetta singer and appeared on stage at a very young age. In 1893 she made her debut as a singer with the play Eldorado, and consequently went on a two-year tour through Italy and the South of France. From 1895 on ...

                                               

Qods

Qods may refer to: Jerusalem, a disputed city in the Levant, sometimes known as Qods from Al-Quds, the Arabic name Qaleh-ye Qods, a village in Markazi Province, Iran Neshan-e Aqdas, Imperial Iranian Order founded in 1870 Shahrak-e Qods, Mahshahr, ...

                                               

Shi-gakkō

The Shi-gakkō or Shigakkō was a system of military academies in Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan during the early Meiji era. Created by Saigō Takamori, the building of these school and the organization of a political clique inside its walls was a caus ...

                                               

Leonid Solarevic

Leonid Solarevic was a Serbian military officer. As a colonel of the Royal Serbian Army, he was one of the main participants in the May Coup of 1903 against King Alexander I of Serbia.