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Flavor

Flavor, flavour, or taste is the perceptual impression of food or other substances, and is determined primarily by the chemical senses of the gustatory and olfactory system. The "trigeminal senses", which detect chemical irritants in the mouth an ...

                                               

Flavorist

A flavorist, also known as flavor chemist, is someone who uses chemistry to engineer artificial and natural flavors. The tools and materials used by flavorists are almost the same as that used by perfumers with the exception that flavorists seek ...

                                               

Food additive

Food additives are substances added to food to preserve flavor or enhance its taste, appearance, or other qualities. Some additives have been used for centuries; for example, preserving food by pickling, salting, as with bacon, preserving sweets ...

                                               

Food and biological process engineering

Food and biological process engineering is a discipline concerned with applying principles of engineering to the fields of food production and distribution and biology. It is a broad field, with workers fulfilling a variety of roles ranging from ...

                                               

Food browning

Browning is the process of food turning brown due to the chemical reactions that take place within. The process of browning is one of the chemical reactions that take place in food chemistry and represents an interesting research topic regarding ...

                                               

Food moisture analysis

Food moisture analysis involves the whole coverage of the food items in the world because foods are comprising a considerable amount of water rather than other ingredients. Foods are vital components which are consumed by the people at each and e ...

                                               

Food packaging

Food packaging is packaging for food. A package provides protection, tampering resistance, and special physical, chemical, or biological needs. It may bear a nutrition facts label and other information about food being offered for sale.

                                               

Food powder

Food powder is the most common format of food material in the market. Powders are particulate discrete solid particles of size ranging from nanometres to millimetres that generally flow freely when shaken or tilted. The bulk powder properties are ...

                                               

Food studies

Food studies is the critical examination of food and its contexts within science, art, history, society, and other fields. It is distinctive from other food-related areas of study such as nutrition, agriculture, gastronomy, and culinary arts in t ...

                                               

Food technology

Food technology is a branch of food science that deals with the production processes that make foods. Early scientific research into food technology concentrated on food preservation. Nicolas Appert’s development in 1810 of the canning process wa ...

                                               

Food Valley

Food Valley is a region in the Netherlands where international food companies, research institutes, and Wageningen University and Research Centre are concentrated. The Food Valley area is the home of a large number of food multinationals and with ...

                                               

Food Weekly News

Food Weekly News is a weekly food science and agricultural newspaper reporting on the latest developments in research in food production. It is published by Vertical News, an imprint of NewsRx, LLC.

                                               

Foodomics

Foodomics was defined in 2009 as "a discipline that studies the Food and Nutrition domains through the application and integration of advanced -omics technologies to improve consumers well-being, health, and knowledge". Foodomics requires the com ...

                                               

Foodpairing

Foodpairing, or the non-registered trademarked term food pairing, is a method for identifying which foods go well together from a flavor standpoint, while food combining identifies foods that match from a nutritional or digestive standpoint. The ...

                                               

Geography of food

The geography of food is a field of human geography. It focuses on patterns of food production and consumption on the local to global scale. Tracing these complex patterns helps geographers understand the unequal relationships between developed a ...

                                               

Gerber method

The Gerber method is a primary and historic chemical test to determine the fat content of substances, most commonly milk and cream. The Gerber method is the primary testing method in Europe and much of the world. The fairly similar Babcock test i ...

                                               

Homogenization (chemistry)

Homogenization or homogenisation is any of several processes used to make a mixture of two mutually non-soluble liquids the same throughout. This is achieved by turning one of the liquids into a state consisting of extremely small particles distr ...

                                               

Ingredient-flavor network

Ingredient-flavor networks are networks describing the sharing of flavor compounds of culinary ingredients. In the bipartite form, an ingredient-flavor network consist of two different types of nodes: the ingredients used in the recipes and the f ...

                                               

Inverted sugar syrup

Inverted sugar syrup is an edible mixture of two simple sugars - glucose and fructose - that is made by heating sucrose with water. It is thought to be sweeter than table sugar, and foods that contain it retain moisture better and crystallize les ...

                                               

Lactobacillus

Lactobacillus is a genus of Gram-positive, facultative anaerobic or microaerophilic, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming bacteria. They are a major part of the lactic acid bacteria group. In humans, they constitute a significant component of the microb ...

                                               

Lactobacillus brevis

Lactobacillus brevis is a gram-positive, rod shaped species of lactic acid bacteria which is heterofermentive, creating CO2 and lactic acid during fermentation. There are approximately 16 different species in L. brevis group. It can be found in m ...

                                               

Liquefaction

In materials science, liquefaction is a process that generates a liquid from a solid or a gas or that generates a non-liquid phase which behaves in accordance with fluid dynamics. It occurs both naturally and artificially. As an example of the la ...

                                               

Melanoidin

Melanoidins are brown, high molecular weight heterogeneous polymers that are formed when sugars and amino acids combine at high temperatures and low water activity. Melanoidins are commonly present in foods that have undergone some form of non-en ...

                                               

Miraculin

Miraculin is a taste modifier, a glycoprotein extracted from the fruit of Synsepalum dulcificum. The berry, also known as the miracle fruit, was documented by explorer Chevalier des Marchais, who searched for many different fruits during a 1725 e ...

                                               

Molecular gastronomy

Molecular gastronomy is a subdiscipline of food science that seeks to investigate the physical and chemical transformations of ingredients that occur in cooking. Its program includes three areas, as cooking was recognized to have three components ...

                                               

Edwin L. Moore

Edwin L. Moore was a researcher for the United States Department of Agriculture. With Louis G. MacDowell and C. D. Atkins in the 1940s, he helped develop a new process for making frozen concentrated orange juice. Moore was inducted into the Flori ...

                                               

Mother of vinegar

Mother of vinegar is a substance composed of a form of cellulose and acetic acid bacteria that develops on fermenting alcoholic liquids, which turns alcohol into acetic acid with the help of oxygen from the air. It is added to wine, cider, or oth ...

                                               

Mouthfeel

Mouthfeel refers to the physical sensations in the mouth caused by food or drink, as distinct from taste. It is a fundamental sensory attribute which, along with taste and smell, determines the overall flavor of a food item. Mouthfeel is also som ...

                                               

Nima (device)

Nima is a portable food sensor designed to enable individuals with food allergies and sensitivities test their food for specific proteins. Nima created and leads the category of consumer food testers. The first product, a gluten sensor was releas ...

                                               

Nixtamalization

Nixtamalization is a process for the preparation of maize, or other grain, in which the corn is soaked and cooked in an alkaline solution, usually limewater, washed, and then hulled. This process is known to remove up to 97–100% of aflatoxins fro ...

                                               

Normalized Difference Red Edge Index

The normalized difference red edge index is a metric that can be used to analyse whether images obtained from multi-spectral image sensors contain healthy vegetation or not. It is similar to Normalized Difference Vegetation Index but uses the rat ...

                                               

NRS process

The "New Regeneration System" NRS process is a process to reduce calcium from beet-root thin-juice. It is used in beet-sugar factories to improve the capacity and operating time of evaporators and to produce soft molasses that can be further de-s ...

                                               

Off-flavour

Off-flavours or off-flavors are taints in food products caused by the presence of undesirable compounds. They can originate in raw materials, from chemical changes during food processing and storage, and from micro-organisms. Off-flavours are a r ...

                                               

Olive oil acidity

Free acidity is an important parameter that defines the quality of olive oil and is defined as a percentage as grams of free fatty acids in 100 grams of oil. As defined by the European Commission regulation No. 2568/91 and subsequent amendments, ...

                                               

Packaging gas

A packaging gas is used to pack sensitive materials such as food into a modified atmosphere environment. The gas used is usually inert, or of a nature that protects the integrity of the packaged goods, inhibiting unwanted chemical reactions such ...

                                               

Paprika oleoresin

Paprika oleoresin is an oil-soluble extract from the fruits of Capsicum annuum or Capsicum frutescens, and is primarily used as a colouring and/or flavouring in food products. It is composed of vegetable oil, capsaicin, the main flavouring compou ...

                                               

Pasteurization

Pasteurization or pasteurisation is a process in which water and certain packaged and non-packaged foods are treated with mild heat, usually to less than 100 °C, to eliminate pathogens and extend shelf life. The process is intended to destroy or ...

                                               

Pectin

Pectin is a structural acidic heteropolysaccharide contained in the primary cell walls of terrestrial plants. Its main component is galacturonic acid, a sugar acid derived from galactose. It was first isolated and described in 1825 by Henri Braco ...

                                               

Phytic acid

Phytic acid is a six-fold dihydrogenphosphate ester of inositol, also called inositol hexakisphosphate or inositol polyphosphate. At physiological pH, the phosphates are partially ionized, resulting in the phytate anion. The myo phytate anion is ...

                                               

Starch production

Starch production is an isolation of starch from plant sources. It takes place in starch plants. Starch industry is a part of food processing which is using starch as a starting material for production of starch derivatives, hydrolysates, dextrin ...

                                               

Putrefaction

Putrefaction is the fifth stage of death, following pallor mortis, algor mortis, rigor mortis, and livor mortis. This process references the breaking down of a body of an animal such as a human post-mortem. In broad terms, it can be viewed as the ...

                                               

Rancidification

Rancidification is the process of complete or incomplete oxidation or hydrolysis of fats and oils when exposed to air, light, or moisture or by bacterial action, resulting in unpleasant taste and odor. Specifically, it is the hydrolysis or autoxi ...

                                               

Refined grains

Refined grains, in contrast to whole grains, refers to grain products consisting of grains or grain flours that have been significantly modified from their natural composition. The modification process generally involves the mechanical removal of ...

                                               

Refractometer

A refractometer is a laboratory or field device for the measurement of an index of refraction. The index of refraction is calculated from Snells law while for mixtures, the index of refraction can be calculated from the composition of the materia ...

                                               

Retort pouch

A retort pouch or retortable pouch is a type of food packaging made from a laminate of flexible plastic and metal foils. It allows the sterile packaging of a wide variety of food and drink handled by aseptic processing, and is used as an alternat ...

                                               

Retrogradation (starch)

Retrogradation is a reaction that takes place when the amylose and amylopectin chains in cooked, gelatinized starch realign themselves as the cooked starch cools. When native starch is heated and dissolved in water, the crystalline structure of a ...

                                               

Rolled oats

Rolled oats are a type of lightly processed whole-grain food. Traditionally, they are made from oat groats that have been dehusked and steamed, before being rolled into flat flakes under heavy rollers and then stabilized by being lightly toasted. ...

                                               

Sham feeding

Sham feeding is any procedure that mimics normal food consumption but where food and drink are not actually digested or absorbed. It is generally used in experiments studying hunger, eating or digestion, and is a predominant method used in studyi ...

                                               

Solid fat index

Solid fat index is a measure of the percentage of fat in crystalline phase to total fat across a temperature gradient. The SFI of a fat is measured using a dilatometer that measures the expansion of a fat as it is heated; density measurements are ...

                                               

Staling

Staling, or going stale ", is a chemical and physical process in bread and similar foods that reduces their palatability - stale bread is dry and hard.