ⓘ Free online encyclopedia. Did you know? page 755




                                               

Melodic fission

In music cognition, melodic fission, is a phenomenon in which one line of pitches is heard as two or more separate melodic lines. This occurs when a phrase contains groups of pitches at two or more distinct registers or with two or more distinct ...

                                               

Music acquisition

Music acquisition is a theory or a term that has not yet been clearly or concisely defined, although there has been research done and attempts to prove that acquiring music, like language, is cognitively possible over time. Furthermore, the proce ...

                                               

Music in psychological operations

Music can be used as a tool of psychological warfare. The term "music torture" is sometimes used to describe the practice. While it is acknowledged by United States interrogation experts to cause discomfort, it has also been characterized as havi ...

                                               

Musicae Scientiae (journal)

Musicae Scientiae is a quarterly peer-reviewed academic journal covering the field of music psychology. The editor-in-chief is Jane Ginsborg. It was established 1997 and is published by Sage Publications on behalf of the European Society for the ...

                                               

Musical anhedonia

Musical anhedonia, also known formally as specific musical anhedonia, is a neurological condition involving an individuals incapacity to enjoy listening to music. Recent empirical research suggests that 3 to 5% of the population are affected by i ...

                                               

Musical hallucinations

Musical hallucinations fall under the category of auditory hallucinations and describe a disorder in which the affected person perceives sounds, instrumental music, or songs, even though no external acoustic stimulus is present. It is a very rare ...

                                               

Musical semantics

Music semantics refers to the ability of music to convey semantic meaning. Semantics are a key feature of language, and whether music shares some of the same ability to prime and convey meaning has been the subject of recent study.

                                               

Musical syntax

When analysing the regularities and structure of music as well as the processing of music in the brain, certain findings lead to the question of whether music is based on a syntax that could be compared with linguistic syntax. To get closer to th ...

                                               

Rothenberg propriety

In diatonic set theory, Rothenberg propriety is an important concept, lack of contradiction and ambiguity, in the general theory of musical scales which was introduced by David Rothenberg in a seminal series of papers in 1978. The concept was ind ...

                                               

Sharawadji effect

The sharawadji effect, not to be confused with sharawadgi, is a musical perception or phenomenon regarding timbre and texture described by Claude Shryer as, "a sensation of plenitude sometimes created by the contemplation of a complex soundscape ...

                                               

Musical literacy

Musical literacy is the reading, writing, and playing of music, as well an understanding of cultural practice and historical and social contexts. Music literacy and music education are frequently talked about relationally and causatively, however ...

                                               

Aleatoric music

Aleatoric music is music in which some element of the composition is left to chance, and/or some primary element of a composed works realization is left to the determination of its performer. The term is most often associated with procedures in w ...

                                               

Algorithmic composition

Algorithmic composition is the technique of using algorithms to create music. Algorithms have been used to compose music for centuries; the procedures used to plot voice-leading in Western counterpoint, for example, can often be reduced to algori ...

                                               

Augmentation (music)

In Western music and music theory, augmentation is the lengthening of a note or interval. Augmentation is a compositional device where a melody, theme or motif is presented in longer note-values than were previously used. Augmentation is also the ...

                                               

Chord (music)

A chord, in music, is any harmonic set of pitches consisting of multiple notes that are heard as if sounding simultaneously. For many practical and theoretical purposes, arpeggios and broken chords, or sequences of chord tones, may also be consid ...

                                               

Chord-scale system

The chord-scale system is a method of matching, from a list of possible chords, a list of possible scales. The system has been widely used since the 1970s and is "generally accepted in the jazz world today". However, the majority of older players ...

                                               

Chromatic fourth

In music, a chromatic fourth, or passus duriusculus, is a melody or melodic fragment spanning a perfect fourth with all or almost all chromatic intervals filled in. The quintessential example is in D minor with the tonic and dominant notes as bou ...

                                               

Constant structure

In jazz, a constant structure is a chord progression consisting of three or more chords of the same type or quality. Popularized by pianists Bill Evans and Herbie Hancock, the combination of functional and nonfunctional chords provides cohesivene ...

                                               

Descending tetrachord

In music theory, the descending tetrachord is a series of four notes from a scale, or tetrachord, arranged in order from highest to lowest, or descending order. For example, - ♭ - ♭ -, as created by the Andalusian cadence. The descending tetracho ...

                                               

Diminution

In Western music and music theory, diminution has four distinct meanings. Diminution may be a form of embellishment in which a long note is divided into a series of shorter, usually melodic, values. Diminution may also be the compositional device ...

                                               

Elementa harmonica

The work is known variously as Aristoxenou or Aristoxenoy Armonika or Harmonika Stoicheia i.e. Aristoxenou Armonika Stoicheia, Aristoxenou Harmonika Stoicheia etc. All of these translate as The Harmonics of Aristoxenus. Elementa harmonica transla ...

                                               

Euclidean rhythm

The Euclidean rhythm in music was discovered by Godfried Toussaint in 2004 and is described in a 2005 paper "The Euclidean Algorithm Generates Traditional Musical Rhythms". The greatest common divisor of two numbers is used rhythmically giving th ...

                                               

Finalis

In maqam music theory, finalis is the name of the note in a maqam where the mode "rests". For most maqams, this is also the tonic note. In Persian traditional music, where the maqam classification has been replaced with the dastgah system, the co ...

                                               

Fragmentation (music)

In music composition, fragmentation is the use of fragments or the "division of a musical idea into segments". It is used in tonal and atonal music, and is a common method of localized development and closure. Fragmentation is related to Arnold S ...

                                               

How Music Works

How Music Works is a non-fiction book by David Byrne, a musician, writer, and public figure best known for his work with the group Talking Heads. He discusses the form and influence of music in a non-linear narrative fashion, using a variety of e ...

                                               

The Language of Music (theory book)

The Language of Music is a contemporary music theory book written by Tom Brooks and published by Hal Leonard Publishing. The book explains principles used in modern music starting at a foundational level and progressing to topics such as Chord Bu ...

                                               

Musica enchiriadis

Musica enchiriadis is an anonymous musical treatise of the 9th century. It is the first surviving attempt to set up a system of rules for polyphony in western art music. The treatise was once attributed to Hucbald, but this is no longer accepted. ...

                                               

Musical argument

A musical argument is a means of creating tension through the relation of expressive content and musical form: Traditional dialectal music is representational: the musical form relates to an expressive content and is a means of creating a growing ...

                                               

Scale (music)

In music theory, a scale is any set of musical notes ordered by fundamental frequency or pitch. A scale ordered by increasing pitch is an ascending scale, and a scale ordered by decreasing pitch is a descending scale. Some scales contain differen ...

                                               

Musical similarity

The notion of musical similarity is particularly complex because there are numerous dimensions of similarity. If similarity takes place between different fragments from one musical piece, a musical similarity implies a repetition of the first occ ...

                                               

Nana (echos)

Phthora nana is one of the ten modes of the Hagiopolitan Octoechos consisting of 8 diatonic echoi and two additional phthorai. It is used in different traditions of Orthodox chant until today. The name "nana" is taken from the syllables sung duri ...

                                               

Nenano

Phthora nenano is the name of one of the two "extra" modes in the Byzantine Octoechos - an eight mode system, which was proclaimed by a synod of 792. The phthorai nenano and nana were favoured by composers at the Monastery Agios Sabas, near Jerus ...

                                               

Neo-Riemannian theory

Neo-Riemannian theory is a loose collection of ideas present in the writings of music theorists such as David Lewin, Brian Hyer, Richard Cohn, and Henry Klumpenhouwer. What binds these ideas is a central commitment to relating harmonies directly ...

                                               

Octave species

In early Greek music theory, an octave species is a sequence of incomposite intervals making up a complete octave. The concept was also important in Medieval and Renaissance music theory.

                                               

Ohm's acoustic law

Ohms acoustic law, sometimes called the acoustic phase law or simply Ohms law, states that a musical sound is perceived by the ear as a set of a number of constituent pure harmonic tones. The law was proposed by physicist Georg Ohm in 1843. Herma ...

                                               

Polish School (music)

The Polish School is the music of several post-1945 Polish composers who share generational and stylistic similarities. Representatives include Tadeusz Baird, Henryk Gorecki, Wojciech Kilar, Witold Lutoslawski, Krzysztof Penderecki, Grazyna Bacew ...

                                               

Privileged pattern

In music a privileged pattern is a motive, figure, or chord which is repeated and transposed so that the transpositions form a recognizable pattern. The pattern of transposition may be either by a repeated interval, an interval cycle, or a stepwi ...

                                               

Pyknon

Pyknon, sometimes also transliterated as pycnon in the music theory of Antiquity is a structural property of any tetrachord in which a composite of two smaller intervals is less than the remaining interval. The makeup of the pyknon serves to iden ...

                                               

Retrograde (music)

A musical line which is the reverse of a previously or simultaneously stated line is said to be its retrograde or cancrizans. An exact retrograde includes both the pitches and rhythms in reverse. An even more exact retrograde reverses the physica ...

                                               

Scolica enchiriadis

Scolica enchiriadis is an anonymous ninth-century music theory treatise and commentary on its companion work, the Musica enchiriadis. These treatises were once attributed to Hucbald, but this is no longer accepted. The Scolica enchiriadis is writ ...

                                               

Slow movement (music)

A slow movement is a form in a multi-movement musical piece. Generally, the second movement of a piece will be written as a slow movement, although composers occasionally write other movements as a slow movement as well. The tempo of a slow movem ...

                                               

Society for Music Theory

The Society for Music Theory is an American organization devoted to the promotion of music theory as a scholarly and pedagogical discipline. It currently has a membership of over 1200, primarily in the United States. In the 1970s, few schools had ...

                                               

Spaltklang

Spaltklang is a term in music theory. It is defined as an extremely clear and transparent sound pattern of an instrumental piece. It stands in opposition to the music of the Classical-Romantic period which favoured the merging of the individual i ...

                                               

Syntagma Musicum

Syntagma Musicum is a book by the German musicologist Michael Praetorius, published in Wittenberg and Wolfenbuttel in three parts between 1614 and 1620. It is one of the most commonly used research sources for the music theory of the seventeenth ...

                                               

Tension (music)

In music, tension is the anticipation music creates in a listeners mind for relaxation or release. For example, tension may be produced through reiteration, increase in dynamic level, gradual motion to a higher or lower pitch, or syncopations bet ...

                                               

Thummer keyboard

A Thummer is a proposed commercial musical instrument characterized by at least one isomorphic keyboard, and thumb-operated and/or motion-sensing expressive controls. The Thummer was to be a type of jammer keyboard. Research suggests that the jam ...

                                               

Tonality

Tonality is the arrangement of pitches and/or chords of a musical work in a hierarchy of perceived relations, stabilities, attractions and directionality. In this hierarchy, the single pitch or triadic chord with the greatest stability is called ...

                                               

Transformational theory

Transformational theory is a branch of music theory developed by David Lewin in the 1980s, and formally introduced in his 1987 work, Generalized Musical Intervals and Transformations. The theory - which models musical transformations as elements ...

                                               

Vogel's Tonnetz

Vogels Tonnetz is a graphical and mathematical representation of the scale range of just intonation, introduced by German music theorist Martin Vogel 1976 in his book Die Lehre von den Tonbeziehungen. The graphical representation is based on Eule ...

                                               

Zoomusicology

Zoomusicology is a field of musicology and zoology or more specifically, zoosemiotics. Zoomusicology is the study of the music of animals, or rather the musical aspects of sound or communication produced and received by animals. Zoomusicology as ...