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ⓘ 1983 in video gaming




1983 in video gaming
                                     

ⓘ 1983 in video gaming

  • January, Electronic Games labels Donkey Kong, Space Panic, and other games with ladders as "climbing games."
  • January, Life magazine runs a two-page spread on arcade game world record holders: "Video Game VIPs."
  • At the first Golden Joystick Awards ceremony held in 1984, Jetpac takes Game of the Year.
  • The fourth Arcade Awards are held, for games released during 1981-1982, with Tron winning best arcade game, Demon Attack best console game, Davids Midnight Magic best computer game, and Galaxian best standalone game.
  • A major shakeout of the North American video game industry "the crash of 1983" begins. By 1986, total video games sales will decrease from US$3.2 billion to US$0.1 billion.
                                     

1. Business

  • In the United States, arcade game revenues are worth $2.9 billion equivalent to $7.44 billion in 2020.
  • In the United States, home video game sales are worth $3.2 billion, according to Nintendo equivalent to $8.21 billion in 2020.
  • Amusement Developing Section 8 later known as Sega-AM2, a research and development department of Sega, is established under the supervision of Yu Suzuki in Tokyo, Japan.
  • Atari files suit against Coleco, claiming violation of Ataris patents on the Atari 2600 video game console. The previous year, Coleco released a peripheral device that made it possible for Atari 2600 game cartridges to be run on the ColecoVision console.
  • In Japan, home video game sales approach ¥400 billion equivalent to $4.75 billion in 2020.
  • Milton Bradley takes over distribution of the Vectrex console after purchasing General Consumer Electronics.
  • MCA Universal files suit against Nintendo, claiming that the latter companys video arcade hit Donkey Kong violated Universals copyright on King Kong. After a brief trial, the judge determined that the rights to the original Kong had passed into the public domain. The case was dismissed, and MCA Universal paid $1.8 million USD in damages to Nintendo.,
  • Defunct companies: Games by Apollo, US Games, Xonox, Starpath.
  • New companies: Aackosoft, Alligata, Beyond, Graftgold, Infogrames, Origin Systems, Interplay, Navarre, Mastertronic, Spectrum HoloByte, Tynesoft
                                     

2.1. Notable releases Games

Arcade

  • November, Sega releases Astron Belt in the United States.
  • May, Sega releases Astron Belt in the Japanese market, the second laserdisc video game. It uses pre-rendered, computer-animated film footage as backdrops, overlaid with sprite graphics.
  • Nintendo releases Punch-Out!! in Japan.
  • Parker Brothers releases James Bond 007.
  • June 19, Cinematronics releases Advanced Microcomputer Systemss Dragons Lair, the third laserdisc video game, and the first in the American market.
  • Bally/Midway releases Spy Hunter. They also release Jr. Pac-Man and quiz game Professor Pac-Man without Namcos authorization, and the latter is an immediate flop.
  • Atari releases the trackball-controlled Crystal Castles.
  • June 14, Nintendo releases Mario Bros., which features the first appearance of Marios brother, Luigi.
  • Konami releases Gyruss in Japan. Centuri distributes the game in North America.
  • December, Namco releases Pole Position II, adding three additional tracks.
  • May, Atari releases Star Wars, a color vector graphics game based on the popular film franchise.
  • August, Sega releases Astron Belt in Europe, as the first laserdisc game in the region.
  • June, Data East releases Begas Battle, a laserdisc video game. It uses anime FMV cut scenes to develop a story between the games shooting stages, which would later become the standard approach to video game storytelling.
  • January, Namco releases Xevious.
  • Williams releases Blaster, which was originally programmed on an Atari 8-bit computer.

Personal computer

  • Ultimate Play the Game, later known as Rare, releases its first video games, Jetpac and Atic Atac, for the ZX Spectrum.
  • Bug-Byte releases Matthew Smiths Manic Miner, a platform game, for the ZX Spectrum.
  • July 8, Infocom releases Planetfall, which becomes one of their top sellers.
  • Electronic Arts publishes its first five titles: Hard Hat Mack, Pinball Construction Set, Archon: The Light and the Dark, M.U.L.E., and Worms?.
  • Psion releases Chequered Flag, the first driving game published for the ZX Spectrum, one of the first computer car simulators, and the first driving game with selectable cars.
  • ASCII releases Bokosuka Wars for the Sharp X1 in Japan. It is a precursor to the tactical role-playing game and real-time strategy genres.
  • August 23, Origin Systems publishes Ultima III: Exodus, one of the first role-playing video games to use tactical, turn-based combat. It is released for the Apple II, Atari 800, Commodore 64, and IBM PC.
  • Hudson Soft releases Bomberman for the MSX and FM-7.
  • The 4-player simultaneous Dandy is released for the Atari 8-bit family. It directly inspires 1985s Gauntlet arcade game.
  • June, Yuji Horii releases The Portopia Serial Murder Case for the NEC PC-6001 in Japan. It is an influential adventure game that lays the foundations for the visual novel genre.
  • Koei releases Nobunagas Ambition for Japanese computers. Its combination of role-playing, turn-based grand strategy and management simulation elements sets a standard for the historical simulation and strategy RPG genres.

Console

  • Activisions final big year of Atari 2600 releases includes Enduro, Decathlon, Keystone Kapers, Robot Tank, and Space Shuttle: A Journey into Space.
  • Mattel Electronics publishes World Series Baseball for the Intellivision, one of the first video games to use multiple camera angles.
  • December 12, Nintendo publishes Donkey Kong Jr. Math, for the Famicom.
                                     

2.2. Notable releases Hardware

Arcade

  • December, Namco Libble Rabble System 16 Universal releases, as Namcos second arcade system board to use a 16-bit microprocessor.
  • May, Sega Laserdisc hardware releases, as the first laserdisc video game hardware.
  • July, Sega System 1 releases, with Star Jacker game. Its graphics chips are later used in the Sega System 16 and Sega Space Harrier boards.

Console

  • GameLine, a combination modem and dialup game distribution service for the Atari 2600, is announced but never ships.
  • July 15, Nintendo releases the Family Computer Famicom console in Japan. Shortly after its release, complaints begin to surface about rampant system instability, prompting Nintendo to issue a product recall and to rerelease the machine with a new motherboard. It would later be released worldwide as the Nintendo Entertainment System NES.
  • July 15, Sega releases the SG-1000 console in Japan, on the same day as the Famicom.
  • October, Casio launches the Casio PV-1000 in Japan. It does not remain on the market for long.
  • October, Gakken launches the Compact Vision TV Boy in Japan. Its the last second generation console released. It was expensive and obsolete at launch, being discontinued shortly after.

Personal computer

  • June, Mattel Electronics releases the Aquarius home computer, originally designed by Radofin Electronics Far East.
  • October, Mattel discontinues the Aquarius.
  • October. Coleco releases the Adam home computer. It is only on the market for 15 months.
  • January, Apple Computer releases the Apple IIe, which becomes their most popular 8-bit machine.
  • Acorn Computers release the Acorn Electron, a cut down version of their BBC Micro to compete in the under £200 home computer market. Problems in manufacture see only 1 in 8 presales being delivered for the Christmas market.
  • June 16, Microsoft Japan releases MSX, an early standardized home computer architecture.
  • Sega releases the SC-3000, a personal computer version of the SG-1000 console, in Japan.
  • March, Atari releases the poorly received 1200XL computer. Late in the year it and the rest of the Atari 8-bit family are replaced by the 600XL and 800XL.


                                     
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