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ⓘ Category:Criminal law




                                               

Criminal law

Criminal law is the body of law that relates to crime. It proscribes conduct perceived as threatening, harmful, or otherwise endangering to the property, health, safety, and moral welfare of people inclusive of ones self. Most criminal law is established by statute, which is to say that the laws are enacted by a legislature. Criminal law includes the punishment and rehabilitation of people who violate such laws. Criminal law varies according to jurisdiction, and differs from civil law, where emphasis is more on dispute resolution and victim compensation, rather than on punishment or rehabi ...

                                               

Abandonment (legal)

In law, abandonment is the relinquishment, giving up or renunciation of an interest, claim, civil proceedings, appeal, privilege, possession, or right, especially with the intent of never again resuming or reasserting it. Such intentional action may take the form of a discontinuance or a waiver. This broad meaning has a number of applications in different branches of law. In common law jurisdictions, both common law abandonment and statutory abandonment of property may be recognized. Common law abandonment is "the relinquishment of a right vesting ownership in any other person; the giving ...

                                               

Abettor

Abettor, is a legal term implying one who instigates, encourages or assists another to commit an offence. An abettor differs from an accessory in that he must be present at the commission of the crime; in addition they are equally guilty as they knowingly and voluntarily assist in the commission of that crime. All abettors with certain exceptions are principals, and, in the absence of specific statutory provision to the contrary, are punishable to the same extent as the actual perpetrator of the offence. A person may in certain cases be convicted as an abettor in the commission of an offen ...

                                               

Abstracting electricity

This offence is created by section 13 of the Theft Act 1968: A person who dishonestly uses without due authority, or dishonestly causes to be wasted or diverted, any electricity shall on conviction on indictment be liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years. This section replaces section 10 of the Larceny Act 1916. The following cases are relevant: R v McCreadie and Tume, 96 Cr App R 143, CA R v Hoar and Hoar Crim LR 247, DC Visiting forces This offence is an offence against property for the purposes of section 3 of the Visiting Forces Act 1952. Mode of trial and sentence T ...

                                               

Accessory (legal term)

An accessory is a person who assists in the commission of a crime, but who does not actually participate in the commission of the crime. The distinction between an accessory and a principal is a question of fact and degree: The principal is the one whose acts or omissions, accompanied by the relevant mens rea Latin for "guilty mind", are the most immediate cause of the actus reus Latin for "guilty act". If two or more people are directly responsible for the actus reus, they can be charged as joint principals see common purpose. The test to distinguish a joint principal from an accessory is ...

                                               

Accusation

An accusation is a statement by one person asserting that another person or entity has done something improper. The person who makes the accusation is an accuser, while the subject against whom it is made is the accused. Whether a statement is interpreted as an accusation relies on the social environment in which it is made: What counts as an accusation is often unclear, and what kind of response is warranted even less clear. Even a purely surface semantic analysis of accusatory language cannot be performed in the absence of social context, including who is making the accusation and to who ...

                                     

ⓘ Criminal law

  • The Criminal Law Consolidation Acts 1861 24 25 Vict. cc. 94 100 were Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. They consolidated provisions from
  • criminal code in Swiss law The original version was created on 21 December 1937. It entered into force on 1 January 1942. Previously, criminal law had
  • Law Order: Criminal Intent is an American police procedural drama television series set in New York City, where it was also primarily produced. Created
  • into one or another of these categories. At common law conduct could not be considered criminal unless a defendant possessed some level of intention 
  • Administration of Criminal Law is a think - tank dedicated to the promotion of good government and prosecution practices in criminal matters. Its work has
  • Islamic criminal law Arabic: فقه العقوبات is criminal law in accordance with Sharia. Strictly speaking, Islamic law does not have a distinct corpus
  • The Criminal Law Amendment Act, 1968 69 was an omnibus bill that introduced major changes to the Canadian Criminal Code. An earlier version was first introduced
  • In criminal law guilt is the state of being responsible for the commission of an offense. Legal guilt is entirely externally defined by the state, or

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