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ⓘ Comparison of web browsers




                                               

Safari (web browser)

Safari is a graphical web browser developed by Apple, based on the WebKit engine. First released on desktop in 2003 with Mac OS X Panther, a mobile version has been bundled with iOS devices since the iPhones introduction in 2007. Safari is the default browser on Apple devices. A Windows version was available from 2007 to 2012.

                                               

Vivaldi (web browser)

Vivaldi is a freeware, cross-platform web browser developed by Vivaldi Technologies, a company founded by Opera Software co-founder and former CEO Jon Stephenson von Tetzchner and Tatsuki Tomita. It was officially launched on April 6, 2016. Although intended for general users, it is first and foremost targeted towards technically-inclined users as well as former Opera users disgruntled by its transition from the Presto layout engine to a Chromium-based browser that resulted in the loss of many of its iconic features. Despite also being Chromium-based, Vivaldi aims to revive the features of ...

                                               

Opera (web browser)

Opera is a freeware web browser for Microsoft Windows, Android, iOS, macOS, and Linux operating systems, developed by Opera Software. Opera is a Chromium-based browser using the Blink layout engine. It differentiates itself because of a distinct user interface and other features. Opera was conceived at Telenor as a research project in 1994 and was bought by Opera Software in 1995. It was commercial software for the first ten years and had its own proprietary Presto layout engine. The Presto versions of Opera received many awards, but Presto development ended after a milestone transition to ...

                                               

Internet Explorer

Internet Explorer is a series of graphical web browsers developed by Microsoft and included in the Microsoft Windows line of operating systems, starting in 1995. It was first released as part of the add-on package Plus! for Windows 95 that year. Later versions were available as free downloads, or in service packs, and included in the original equipment manufacturer service releases of Windows 95 and later versions of Windows. The browser is discontinued, but still maintained. Internet Explorer was once the most widely used web browser, attaining a peak of about 95% usage share by 2003. Thi ...

                                               

Firefox

Mozilla Firefox, or simply Firefox, is a free and open-source web browser developed by the Mozilla Foundation and its subsidiary, Mozilla Corporation. Firefox uses the Gecko layout engine to render web pages, which implements current and anticipated web standards. In 2017, Firefox began incorporating new technology under the code name Quantum to promote parallelism and a more intuitive user interface. Firefox is officially available for Windows 7 or newer, macOS, and Linux. Its unofficial ports are available for various Unix and Unix-like operating systems including FreeBSD, OpenBSD, NetBS ...

                                               

Yandex Browser

Yandex Browser is a freeware web browser developed by the Russian web search corporation Yandex that uses the Blink web browser engine and is based on the Chromium open source project. The browser checks webpage security with the Yandex security system and checks downloaded files with Kaspersky anti-virus. The browser also uses Opera Softwares Turbo technology to speed web browsing on slow connections. The browser is available for Windows, macOS, Android and iOS. In October 2014 a Linux beta version was introduced. Yandex is facing web search competition in Russia from Google Search. Googl ...

Comparison of web browsers
                                     

ⓘ Comparison of web browsers

Browsers are compiled to run on certain operating systems, without emulation.

This list is not exhaustive, but rather reflects the most common OSes today e.g. Netscape Navigator was also developed for OS/2 at a time when macOS 10 did not exist but does not include the growing appliance segment. Both the web browser and OS means most recent version, example: Windows 8 with Internet Explorer 10.

                                     

1. Accessibility features

Information about what common accessibility features are implemented natively without third-party add-ons. Browsers that do not support pop-ups have no need for pop-up blocking abilities, so that field is marked as N/A.

                                     

2. Acid scores

The Acid tests are online test suites to determine aspects of standards compliance, to expose web page rendering flaws, and to rate the performance of browsers. Upon each tests release, they are designed so that no existing browser can pass without further development. In order for a browser to pass any Acid test, the latest public release of the browser must meet the requirements shown below. In addition, the browser should be tested upon completion of installation, with no add-ons installed some browsers make this easy by providing a "safe mode" option and all the factory settings no options have been changed from their defaults.

Acid1:

  • Text can be highlighted and radio buttons can be selected.
  • Final rendering looks exactly like the rendering provided by the Acid tests website.

Acid2:

  • Smileys nose turns blue when hovered over.
  • Final rendering looks exactly like the rendering provided by the Acid tests website.

Acid3:

  • Final rendering looks exactly like the rendering provided by the Acid tests website.
  • Test does not report failed tests or abnormal delays leftclick letter "A" to obtain a report
                                     

3. HTML5 support

The specifications for HTML5 are still under development, but many current browsers already support many of the new features in the draft specifications. An HTML5 test suite is also under development that, while it does not test all of the new features nor the functionality of those it does detect, rates browsers support. New tests are expected to be added to the suite as time goes by.

As new tests are added, bogus ones removed, etc., new versions of html5test.com become available as preliminary beta or even alpha versions. These are great to test development versions e.g. nightly builds of web browsers, but their results should be taken with a grain of salt. Especially when considering that some browsers have experimental features built in which may be switched off by default.

                                     

4. Web technology support

Information about what web standards, and technologies the browsers support, except for JavaScript. External links lead to information about support in future versions of the browsers or extensions that provide such functionality.

                                     

5. Plugins and syndicated content support

Information about what web standards, and technologies the browsers support. External links lead to information about support in future versions of the browsers or extensions that provide such functionality.

                                     

6. JavaScript support

Information about what JavaScript technologies the browsers support. Note that although XPath is used by XSLT, it is only considered here if it can be accessed using JavaScript. External links lead to information about support in future versions of the browsers or extensions that provide such functionality, e.g., Babel.

See what parts of DOM your browser supports

                                     

7. Protocol support

Information about what internet protocols the browsers support in addition to HTTP that all modern browser should and do fully support). External links lead to information about support in future versions of the browsers or extensions that provide such functionality.

More than half of web traffic from Chrome to Googles servers is handled by QUIC protocol, not TCP or HTTP/1. Chrome and Opera have support for QUIC, and HTTP/3.

                                     

8. Image format support

Information about what image formats the browsers support. External links lead to information about support in future versions of the browsers or extensions that provide such functionality.

                                     

9. Security and vulnerabilities

For comparison of unpatched publicly known vulnerabilities in latest stable version browsers based on vulnerabilities reports see Secunia. See browser security for more details about the importance of unpatched known flaws.

                                     
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