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ⓘ World




                                               

World

The World is the planet Earth and all life on it, including human civilization. In a philosophical context, the "world" is the whole of the physical Universe, or an ontological world. In a theological context, the world is the material or the profane sphere, as opposed to the celestial, spiritual, transcendent or sacred spheres. "End of the world" scenarios refer to the end of human history, often in religious contexts. The history of the World is commonly understood as the history of humanity spanning the major geopolitical developments of about five millennia, from the first civilization ...

                                               

Demographics of the world

Demographics of the world include population density, ethnicity, education level, health measures, economic status, religious affiliations and other aspects of the human population of Earth. The worlds overall population density is 50 people per km² 129.28 per sq. mile, excluding Antarctica. Nearly two-thirds of the worlds population lives in Asia, with more than 2.5 billion in the countries of China and India combined. The worlds literacy rate has increased dramatically in the last 40 years, from 66.7% in 1979 to 86.3% today. This low rate is mostly attributable to poverty. Lower literacy ...

                                               

Ecumene

The ecumene or oecumene was an ancient Greek term for the known, the inhabited, or the habitable world. Under the Roman Empire, it came to refer to civilization as well as the secular and religious imperial administration. In present usage, it is most often used in the context of "ecumenical" and describes the Christian Church as a unified whole, or the unified modern world civilization. It is also used in cartography to describe a type of world map used in late Antiquity and the Middle Ages.

                                               

Global brain

The global brain is a neuroscience-inspired and futurological vision of the planetary information and communications technology network that interconnects all humans and their technological artifacts. As this network stores ever more information, takes over ever more functions of coordination and communication from traditional organizations, and becomes increasingly intelligent, it increasingly plays the role of a brain for the planet Earth.

                                               

Global change

Global change refers to planetary-scale changes in the Earth system. The system consists of the land, oceans, atmosphere, polar regions, life, the planets natural cycles and deep Earth processes. These constituent parts influence one another. The Earth system now includes human society, so global change also refers to large-scale changes in society. More completely, the term "global change" encompasses: population, climate, the economy, resource use, energy development, transport, communication, land use land cover, urbanization, globalization, atmospheric circulation, ocean circulation, t ...

                                               

Global commons

Global commons is a term typically used to describe international, supranational, and global resource domains in which common-pool resources are found. Global commons include the earths shared natural resources, such as the high oceans, the atmosphere and outer space and the Antarctic in particular. Cyberspace may also meet the definition of a global commons.